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Monday, September 15, 2008

Aunt Modean

Back in grad school, I wrote a paper about my great-aunt, Modean. It's an incredibly sad story that I discovered while digging through my grandma's cedar chest. (Everyone's grandma has a cedar chest, right?) Anyway, I found a stack of letters my Aunt Modean wrote to my grandma back in the 40's when they were both young women--Modean was just 25, and Grandma was even younger. I was intrigued by what I read and wanted to find out more. Luckily, the next semester of grad school, the professor in one of my courses wanted us to write a paper about lost freedoms. I saw my opportunity to do some research and put the pieces of Modean's story together. My professor, Dr. Earl Schrock, who is a jewel of a man not to mention teacher, thought I should try to submit the paper for publication. I didn't agree, but relented a bit and sent it to a small historical society that was relevant to the story. Anyway... I knew the paper was still floating somewhere out there on the web, but yesterday I realized it was still up on the website. The paper concerns tuberculosis, and apparently, many people relate to the story... and as a result, they haven't taken it down. Now, keep in mind, this was written in grad school, and as I re-read it, I cringe at all the stuff I'd like to go back and re-write. BUT it's a great story, though very, very, very sad. It's sort of long, and boring in parts, but I thought I'd share, especially for my family who read this blog and may not know Modean's story.

So, CLICK HERE, then scroll down to the FEATURED ITEMS OF INTEREST SECTION (under 'White Squirrels and Old Home Remedies!!), and you'll find it there.

9 comments:

Sara said...

Oh, that was so sad!!

dkarr99 said...

Hey Angela, I included this article in the book I am writing on our family history. My mom has Modean's purse and I asked her to get it out of her cedar chest to show me. It still had check stubs in it from when she worked in the shoe factory. My mom still cries when she talks about her. Your article is on the USGenweb for Lawrence Co. MO.

The Slaughters said...

How neat, Denise. I still have her Bible, but I think I told you that before. I can't imagine how Aunt Ina feels being the last sister living. I wish I could see her again.

Chris said...

They must have replaced your paper...I am so sad I didn't get to read it! I love your writings! Just wish I could write so like U!

If you find a copy or have a copy email it to me!

Chris said...

FOUND IT....sometimes I think I can't see and think at the same time!

Chris said...

Angela, this is so sad. You have a gift, use that gift to share with others.

Aunt Ina, this is the only other person I have heard named "Ina", my grandmother's hame was Ina Mae. I miss her so much!

History, oh what we could share, our history is dieing with our relatives.....use your gift my child!

The Slaughters said...

Chris, my Aunt Ina is Ina Marie, but she was the last of twelve kids (right, Denise??), so they called her "Pee Wee" for most of her life!

Jill said...

Oh my goodness, Angela. That was an incredible story! And your family sounds just like mine in the way you quote them. Good ol' Ozark folks.

Guillen said...

Hey Angela. Isn't Dr. Schrock amazing? I took every class he taught as an undergrad at Tech. He actually submitted one of my papers from his American Folklore class to the University of Arkansas folklore publication. Pretty neat huh?